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Student work


Student work: Scraps of Memory by Catherine Munro

The Creative Arts program encourages interdisciplinary approaches. It’s great to see how students can navigate multiple units to build a coherent creative practice. It can be hard to juggle different parts of a practice based course and one of the key challenges, I think, can be finding how to develop an individual direction. It can be very useful to step back and reflect on what are the ideas and methods that really drive and inspire you. This body of work entitled Scraps of Memory, by HE5 Creative Arts student Catherine Munro feels useful to share with wider OCA.

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Student work: Helen Price

I enjoyed the way that art history and context was interwoven throughout the course. As each unit was presented, different artists and works were introduced in a way that was relevant to the project at hand. I found this to be a refreshing approach, in contrast to a timeline-based introduction to the history of art.

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Writing & illustrating – A tutor & student co-operative project

I’d like to report on a co-operative project between myself, a writer/tutor and poet on one hand, and Dorothy Flint, a second year illustration student on the other..  We worked together over several months. The co-operative project grew out of Dorothy’s need to find a client for her illustration course and my need to find an artist who wanted a client to make a visual contribution to the  poems I had already written between 2015 and 2018.

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In conversation with: Hayley & Ása

Tutor Hayley Lock chats to student Asa Aradottir about her interests in ecology and how her passions for her immediate landscape are becoming integrated in your OCA studies. They also discuss  how Asa moves her painting practice through the different landscapes of Iceland and Arizona. All photographs courtesy of Ólafur Arnalds.

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OCA student work: David Price

OCA Visual Communications degree student David Price successfully completed his Level 3 studies in July this year. His final major project was Darwin, a 60 page graphic novel that David wrote and drew which examines the life and work of English naturalist Charles Darwin. David discussed the development of the project, his inspiration and creative process with the OCA.

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Student work: A travelling exhibition

I made it at last, and have just finished my final textile degree course. It’s an important moment and one I wished to share by exhibiting three large textile and paper mache pieces. 

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Critical thinking: Developing a model as an approach to problem-solving

Critical thinking and reflection are powerful tools which add validity and credibility to qualitative research, but they can be challenging to apply because there is no single ‘right way’ or set of prescriptive instructions which can be followed. Over time, I began to see that the challenge could be used to my advantage, because the tools are versatile and can be adapted and applied to many different situations. 

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Student work: Sarah-Jane Field

“This was exactly what I’d been searching for as I’ve been trying to get to grips with a developing practice, one that is moving away from straight photography; and I’ve been on the lookout for opportunities to synthesise previous experience as an actor with what I have been learning while studying with the OCA. “

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Student work: Selina Wallace

OCA BA (Hons) Photography student Selina Wallace has a current exhibition Perfectly Imperfect. The show runs until 20 October as part of the Ballarat International Foto Biennale. Below Selina tells us about putting the exhibition together and about her experience of studying with the OCA. “My work is part of the open program for the […]

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OCA study event review: OCA London

Blog post by OCA student Richard Keys. “What a fabulous time I had last weekend. Six of us met at the Hayward Gallery to see the exhibition Kiss My Genders, to have a social chat and to critique work that we had brought along.”

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