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Painting with architecture in mind

Dr. Linda Khatir, artist and Curriculum Leader for Fine Art with the OCA, has contributed to an academic publication exploring the question of painting from an architectural perspective.

Painting with Architecture in Mind, Essays on Painting and Architecture has recently been published by Wunderkammer Press/Bath Spa University and brings together prominent and up and coming authors to consider painting in relation to its architectural frame or display space.
The authors consider ways in which thinking about painting (its mode of expression and form of expansion) challenges the architecturalised environment, providing a bold challenge to the preconception of the symmetrical histories of architecture and painting.
The book opens with a paper on architecture and colour by the world-renowned architect and visual artist Mark Pimlott, and includes the keynote paper Matisse in the Becoming-Architecture of Painting by Eric Alliez and Jean Claude Bonne (presented for the first time in an English translation by Alberto Toscano, Linda Khatir and Andrew Goffey).
Ed Whittaker, Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at Bath Spa University, said: “Painting with Architecture in Mind offers exciting and thought -provoking debate on the subject of painting and architecture and suggests the rethinking of the terms of reference for both disciplines. This beautifully illustrated volume should appeal to anyone interested in not only looking at paintings, but also why they are where they are.”
Other authors include John Chilver, Alex Coles, Bernice Donszelman, Catherine Ferguson, and Linda Khatir.
The official book launch will take place in October at St. Martin in the Fields, London, but copies are available now through Amazon, Blackwells and other book retailers.


Posted by author: Paul Vincent
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One thought on “Painting with architecture in mind

  • We need only look at certain churches to see how art of the past related to its architecture. Wall paintings and panels worked beautifully with the stone vaults and architraves, sometimes forcing you to halt in your tracks and sometimes inviting you in for closer inspection/adoration. Corporate collections of bland works in shiny frames hanging all in a row have a lot to learn about relating art to a space.

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