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study visit


Study Visit Review: London group study day

This study day has helped me to forge a different relationship with the landscape viewing it as place enables me to discuss or form my own relationship with that place rather than an exact physical depiction. I enjoyed using my own memories; nightclubs, brightness, misty dark mountains, land…

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'Virtual' study event

This virtual study visit has been designed by way of a resource pack to give students adequate resources to either attend the exhibition physically or complete research online to then partake in an online discussion. This is a pilot initiative so please do sign up and give it a go!

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Study event review: Art & Environment weekend. Day 2

Students attending were taking OCA units in various disciplines across photography, drawing and creative writing at all levels. There was interest to share ideas and approaches across disciplines and it felt there was common ground in our various connections to nature, ecology, landscape, gardening, geology and the outdoors.

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Brighton Photo Biennial: Update

From 26 to 28 October OCA will be running a weekend study visit to the Brighton Photo Biennial. The weekend will run from 2pm on Friday to 2pm on Sunday and students can attend for the whole weekend or specific days.

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London Group study day

Please note there are only a couple of spaces remaining for students who have not previously attended a study event but do register your interest and we can look to add another date.

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Creative writing hangout: Revealing character through script

Join OCA tutor Guy Mankowski on the 15 August at 6pm. In this session we will be discussing how to use the script form to both build and to reveal your character.

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Aftermath & Shape of Light

Aftermath explores the response of artists from 1918 -1940. While some wanted to return to more traditional forms of representation, others were committed to experimentation and to criticising the unequal society which they believed had caused the war.

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