Jim, Author at The Open College of the Arts - Page 5 of 5
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Little Sparta

‘The most important new garden in Britain since 1945’ says Sir Roy Strong, about Ian Hamilton Finlay’s garden ‘Little Sparta‘ set in the Pentland Hills, 25 miles from Edinburgh. Not the easiest garden to visit by public transport, but a minibus runs on certain days from Edinburgh and it was during the Festival that the […]

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Small shows, big ideas: from Jane Avril to Vorticism

Travelling between exhibitions often requires a certain amount of mental and physical agility. Two shows now on in London will take you from the dance halls of Montmartre to the streets of Edwardian London. Both shows are small in scale but big in ideas, with the prize going to the Courtauld Gallery’s Toulouse -Lautrec exhibition. […]

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Bonjour Monsieur Moreau

In Paris what is the art lover to do after having seen every Impressionist picture on offer and having spent a day traipsing around the Louvre? Well the answer is to seek out the studios of famous artists and to visit the city’s cemeteries. Gustav Moreau, the symbolist painter, left his town house to the […]

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In search of the Large Glass

An opportunity to visit Philadelphia meant being able to see the work of two great artists; one French, the other American – Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) and Thomas Eakins (1844-1916). Today, works of Art can be viewed in the comfort of your own home at the touch of a button but how close to the original […]

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In the days of the comet…

The British Art Show 7 is not a title that would normally send you rushing to the Hayward Gallery eager to see the brightest and best of contemporary British Art . As an exhibition it comes around ever 5 years or so and tries to give an overview of those who are to be considered […]

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The Americans are coming ….

Exhibitions of paintings by Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, Andrew Wyeth, Alice Neil and Norman Rockwell have all been shown in the past few years in London and now at the National Gallery there is an exhibition of George Bellows and the Ashcan School with Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven (they’re actually Canadians) appearing […]

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Does art always have to change?

The watercolour exhibition at the Tate Britain is for the most part an excellent show. It highlights the special qualities of the medium and the skill and technical achievements of its greatest exponents. Thomas Girtin’s ‘White house Chelsea’ is exhibited besides Turner’s ‘The Blue Rigi’; Ravilious’s ‘Vale of the White Horse’ can be seen alongside […]

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Norman Rockwell at the Dulwich Picture Gallery

The Dulwich Picture Gallery in South London is the oldest public art Gallery in England.  This small beautifully lit Gallery was designed by the Architect Sir John Soane in 1817 to house a collection of Old Master Paintings and to include a Mausoleum for its benefactors.   Recently it has embarked on a series of interesting […]

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Master cards at the Courtauld

The Courtauld Gallery has recently been showing a series of small specialist exhibitions of artists work that have included  Sickert’s  Camden Town Nudes, Michelangelo’s Drawings and  Frank Auerbach’s  London Building Sites. It is now the turn of Cezanne’s Card Players, and, on display alongside the Courtauld’s own acquisitions, are a number of studies and related […]

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Grief and vinegar with your chips?

A visit to Madrid recently meant an opportunity to see Picasso’s great anti-war statement “Guernica.” Painted in 1937 the painting was commissioned by the Spanish Government for the Spanish Pavilion at the Paris World Fair. The subject matter was to become Picasso’s reaction to the bombing of the Basque town of Guernica, which was attacked […]

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