James Pyman, Author at The Open College of the Arts
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James Pyman


Beeple’s ‘Everydays’: The Value of Digital Artwork

Last week an artwork sold at Christie’s Auction House for $65m (about £47m). ‘Everydays: The First 5,000 Days’ by the American artist Beeple (better known to his family as Mike Winkelmann) is now the most expensive piece of digital art ever created, but its provenance and value are not contained within the work itself, as […]

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New Level 1 Course Unit: Graphic Fiction

The new Graphic Fiction 1 course unit considers the ongoing development of this understanding of comics, from what was once considered only reading material for children to what is known in France as ‘the ninth art’ and an American cultural export as esteemed as jazz or baseball.

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New course: Visual Exploration

The Visual Exploration unit supports a self-directed approach to exploring and articulating your personal creative voice by extending a process-led approach to how you generate ideas, develop visual and technical skills across a choice of media and technologies, and by establishing new ways of working by undertaking self-initiated projects and reflecting on the creative processes of other practitioners.

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OCA student work: David Price

OCA Visual Communications degree student David Price successfully completed his Level 3 studies in July this year. His final major project was Darwin, a 60 page graphic novel that David wrote and drew which examines the life and work of English naturalist Charles Darwin. David discussed the development of the project, his inspiration and creative process with the OCA.

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OCA recommends: ‘Manga’ at the British Museum, until 26 August 2019

Until around 20 years ago, it was possible to determine a comics artist or illustrator’s national and cultural origins from their aesthetic – from the elements of composition, mark-making, gesturality and myriad other aspects of image-making that comprised their personal visual language. Now none of these origins can be taken for granted. The fundamental question this raises is about the future of design and illustration generally – is the increasing similarity of visuality a ‘good thing’ or not?

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