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Bryan


Reflecting on Duodecimal

The MA Fine Art course offered by the OCA is a cohort-oriented postgraduate course that results in a group exhibition of work. This year twelve students from the UK, Northern Ireland, Cyprus, Sweden, Austria, Italy and the USA all showed their work at The Civic in Barnsley under the title ‘Duodecimal’.

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Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

I have always thought that serious art is not just something put into the world by its makers to express their feeling or point of view or as a reaction to some external stimulus. It’s also in conversation with work made in the past, sometimes reluctantly, sometimes in spite of the artist’s intention. To a greater or lesser extent, all works of art join a continuum that stretches back to prehistory.

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Showing at Home: Apples and Pears Gallery

Another solution is to use your home to show work. Clearing some wall space and hanging a show – taking the endeavour seriously – and inviting friends and fellow students to an opening will help you think about your work differently. It could also lead to you curating a small group show in the same space.

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Why you Should Go To See The Leonardo Da Vinci Show

Da Vinci died 500 years ago this year, hence the shows. All of these drawings are over 500 years old and can’t really have any bearing on contemporary art or thinking, surely?
Well, I disagree.

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'The Colour of Memory'

Join drawing and painting tutor Bryan Eccleshall at Tate Modern on Saturday March 23 to see the Pierre Bonnard retrospective ‘The Colour of Memory’.

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Some thoughts on criticality

Critical Art can be hard to understand – it’s designed to be challenging after all – but the bracing experience of having one’s expectations re-calibrated so that we can understand everything anew, or at least from a different point of view is to be encouraged.

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Book Review: Anne D’Alleva’s 'How to Write Art History'

Writing about works of art can be tricky, especially if you’re trying to build up a body of knowledge from a standing start as well as link it — perhaps at the repeated behest of your tutor — to work that you’ve made. Finding a way to turn the experience of looking at something into meaningful text isn’t easy, but developing a way of clearly writing about the visual is an important skill to acquire when studying art.

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